Articles Tagged with montgomery county

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World Suicide Prevention Day raises awareness of mental health issues and some of the consequences of untreated disorders. Oftentimes, these mental health issues intersect with criminal defense. After practicing law in Montgomery County, Texas for almost 11 years I have identified certain fact patterns where mental illness reveals itself. This can be seen in drug, assault and other cases. While there are certain similarities in cases where underlying mental health issues exist, each person and condition is unique in their own right. Mental health is a complex and nuanced topic that requires much more attention than one blog post. This is just one effort in honor of World Suicide Prevention Day.

If you’re arrested for a criminal offense, that does not mean that you’re a bad person. Innocent until proven guilty, right? Exactly. Outside of the pillars of the Constitution, the law, your individual rights, and the presumption of innocence this is even more true for someone suffering from a mental illness. I see this in drug cases when people are suffering from what is diagnosed by a qualified professional as bipolar disorder, depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, etc. who simply just want to feel better; they want the pain to stop. I see this in assault cases where the person is in crisis and not typically a violent person, but can’t process through conflict or control their emotions. Many cases that come across my desk lack criminal intent, but contain an unmistakable element of untreated mental health conditions.

Overall our system is lacking for those who suffer with mental health issues. However, in the cases where my client lacks criminal intent or simply needs help, I work with some local resources such as diversion courts, DWI and Drug Court, Mental Health Court Services and other local mental health professionals to find a plan to meet their needs and in the right situations – resolve their case.

K9 Units in Montgomery County & How They Impact Your Drug Case

K9 in Montgomery County & Your Drug Case
Stakes rise for those in possession of drugs in The Woodlands, Texas and surrounding areas as Montgomery County Precinct Three (3) Constable’s Office adds two new K9 officers to their team. The two dogs, Rambo and Marlin, will be doing double duty as narcotics and patrol K9s. However, an alert in a search by Rambo or Marlin to drugs isn’t the smoking gun many think. There are both scientific and legal issues to consider when addressing K9 search cases. What are they and how do they impact your case?

K9 dogs are specially trained to alert to the odor of drugs in a vehicle. Animal behaviorists and trainers work with the dogs to cue on demand to the smell of marijuana, cocaine, heroin, etc. If a dog though, is man’s best friend how is he going to sell you out like that? Well, what is more loyal than a dog? Nothing really. They are loyal by nature. By nature though, they also eat, sleep, love on you and…smell around; sniffing your food, your butt, and the air. When the odor of a substance is present in the air they will react.

“How Did My Vape Pen Land Me a Felony Charge?” And Other THC Related Questions

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The advent and mainstream use of CBD products, changes in the legislature and Travis Scott have normalized marijuana usage and desensitized Texas high schoolers and young adults to the criminal consequences of some products. Gummies, wax, and vape pens aren’t your parents’ blunts or joints. And partly the reason you were charged with a felony when you were arrested in Montgomery County with your vape pen. But, why is that really?

A vape pen is a compact, on-the go vaporizer that resembles a pen. Otherwise known as a dab pen, wax pen, or vaporizer, it uses cartridges to produce a vapor from an oil that can be inhaled by users. Cartridges can contain nicotine, CBD or THC oils. THC oil contains tetrahydrocannabinol, which is a Penalty Group 2 substance.

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After a couple of months of being shut down, the world prepares to reopen. Texas Governor Abbott announced on April 27th his phases to begin opening the state back up. Today, under Phase 1, many businesses take down the shutters and open their doors at 25% occupancy to restless communities and anxious employees. Montgomery County though, under County Judge Mark Keough’s interpretation of the order, resumes business as usual with more expansive reopenings; this includes bars. If you’re someone who has been counting down the days and have your first day of socializing outfit picked out, be careful.

Since the Natural Disaster Declaration and Stay-At-Home Order, arrest numbers have been down throughout Texas. While the courts have been working diligently to reduce the amount of bail bonds and issue Personal Recognizance Bonds to lower jail populations in an effort to flatten the spread of the virus, law enforcement has seen a drop in incidents of Driving While Intoxicated. Montgomery County specifically, typically strives to be strident in their attacks on DWI. Montgomery County became one of the first Texas counties to participate in the No Refusal Initiative in 2005 that allows mandatory blood draws.

No Refusal Weekends traditionally have been holiday weekends, such as Memorial Day, Labor Day, Halloween, and the time starting from Thanksgiving through Christmas and ending after New Years Eve. For example from December 21, 2018 through January 1, 2019, Montgomery County law enforcement arrested approximately 146 individuals under the suspicion of Driving While Intoxicated (DWI). The time between Memorial Day Weekend and Labor Day Weekend has been dubbed the “100 Deadliest Days of Summer.” In 2019, 766 people were arrested for alcohol related offenses during these days.

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